Curators

The HATCH Curators' Series/


WHEN IT COMES TO CONTEMPORARY ART, BLAIR CLARKE OF VOLTZ CLARKE HAS OUR EAR. THE NYC GALLERIST WAS AN EASY PICK AS ONE OF OUR FIRST CURATORS: AS WE REFLECTED ON THE PROCESS OF FILLING OUR NEW LOFT, WE CHATTED WITH HER ABOUT HOW SHE’D FILL HERS.

Clarke often stages exhibits in apartments (even her own, which she shares with her two daughter and husband, Head of Sotheby’s European Furniture, Alistair Clarke), bringing to light the relationship between art curation and interior design. With a gallery space on the Upper East Side that maintains a roster of international artists and an even wider reach through the production of public exhibits as well private consultation, Blair’s discerning eye has been trusted by many. Get a clue with her tips below.
WHEN YOU APPROACH AN OPEN SPACE, WHAT ARE THE THINGS YOU LOOK FOR, STRUCTURALLY OR AESTHETICALLY?
Details. Details. Details. My ideal space features lots of details in moldings, built-ins, and windows. Moldings because they provide a lot of textural play and add warmth to even the simplest spaces. Windows are another major component that everyone should look for. Good lighting does wonders for open spaces, and great lighting is almost magical. There’s also a grandiosity with vaulted ceilings that just can’t be mimicked in an open space.
WHAT ARE SOME KEY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN CURATING A LARGE SPACE AND A SMALLER SPACE? OR AN OPEN SPACE AND A PARTITIONED ONE?
With a smaller space, one must curate the pieces that go into it. As there’s less visual relief with wall space, style needs to be comprehensive and cohesive. The sprawl of larger spaces allows for more graphic mix and matching. Not to say you can’t be bold in smaller spaces, but you should be more conscientious of the “total look.”
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NAME TWO OR THREE ARTISTS YOU WOULD RECOMMEND FOR THE HATCH LOFT AND AESTHETIC AND PLEASE TELL US WHY.
Bradley Sabin’s works would work beautifully in a loft space. As his ceramic sculptural installations spread organically across walls, his works become a kind of beautiful architectural detail. Additionally, Jacinto Moros Borges’ monotypes have a beautiful scale and palette that pairs well with the open space of loft living. Lisa Schulte’s neon and driftwood sculptures also mimic the loft aesthetic. They’re raw and organic but chic with industrial charm and attitude.

Lisa Schulte with her work
 BIGGEST MYTH ASSOCIATED WITH BUYING OR COLLECTING ART FOR THE HOME OR PERSONAL SPACE?
One of the biggest myths associated with buying art for the home is that high prices are an indication of quality. While this can be true, Voltz Clarke represents a wide-ranging roster of artists that deliver equal impact despite differing price points. Choose what speaks to you.
Jacinto for WP 2                                                                                                                         ‘FINEX’ and ‘Monotype FCIRM’ by Jacinto Moros
 WHAT TRENDS SHOULD WE BE KEEPING UP WITH IN THE ART WORLD?
The art world seems to permeate everything these days. The next vertical is travel. As of late, it seems that people seek out accommodations based on the art collections found there. My favorite hotel in Italy, Le Sireneuse, has just hired a full-time curator for their rotating collection. Next on their agenda–an important neon installation from a prominent Turner Prize winner.
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All artists’ photos provided by Voltz Clarke.

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